In March of 2007 I was at my monthly oncologist appt for routine labs. I had previously had creatinine levels in the 0.8-1.0 range. Looking back in my records my creatinine on January 2, 2007 was 0.9. January 30th it was 1.0. February 27th it was 1.5. March 30th it jumped to 4.0. At this last level my doctor advised me he was going to admit me to the hospital.

At this time I had been on Biaxin, Revlimid and Dexamethasone for three months with not a very dramatic response, as well as taking microalgae for its antioxidant benefit. I had also received Zometa recently and had been on Ibuprofen. While in the hospital I was diagnosed with Acute Renal Failure (ARF). I was put on i.v. fluids and my chemotherapy was changed to Velcade. I also had a kidney biopsy performed which revealed I had “myeloma kidney”. My doctors call was to have me receive plasmapheresis treatments.

I first had to have a catheter inserted near my collar bone. The catheter had two lumens. One took the protein out and the other replaced it with albumin (I think Beth, I’m not 100% sure). I had five treatments, two as a hospital patient and the other three as an out-patient. It was an amazing experience. I was connected to this fairly large machine that had buttons, dials and lights along with the tubes that were connected to my catheter. The process took between 60-90 minutes. They can adjust the speed of the machine and it was necessary to do this a little at a time.

The process was painless. I do remember I was chilly during the transfer. They warmed the albumin before it was introduced to my system. They did tell me I might experience tingly sensations around my mouth but I never did.

During the process you could read, watch tv, listen to tapes or sleep. The nurse was there with me during the total procedure.

Each day I had treatment they took my labs and my creatinine continued to improve.
In September I did a SCT and my creatinine is now at 1.9.

04/04/13
BioInvent Presents Positive Data for BI-505 at International Myeloma Congress

Lund, Sweden – 4 April 2013 – BioInvent International AB (OMXS:BINV) announce that the previously communicated positive results from a phase I trial of BI-505 is presented today at The International Myeloma Workshop in Kyoto, Japan. At the same meeting, preclinical data is also presented which demonstrate significantly enhanced efficacy when approved myeloma drugs are combined with BI-505. BI-505 is a human antibody directed against ICAM-1 and is developed for the treatment of multiple myeloma.

The results from the phase I study of BI-505 in patients with advanced multiple myeloma are presented by Associate Professor Markus Hansson at Lund University. The preliminary analysis shows that BI-505 has an advantageous safety profile. In cohorts where extended treatment was available, 24 percent of the patients had stable disease for at least two months, indicating effect of BI-505.

At the same meeting, new preclinical data is also presented showing significantly enhanced anti-myeloma activity when the approved drugs Velcade® or Revlimid® is combined with BI-505 compared to single agent treatment. Combined treatment was evaluated in two different experimental models and the drugs were given in a similar way as to patients with myeloma. In one of the models enhanced survival was observed following combination therapy with BI-505, compared to single agent treatment with the approved drugs. In the second model, complete remission was observed in the majority of animals when combining BI-505 with Revlimid® or Velcade®.

Cristina Glad, CEO for BioInvent, commented: “We believe BI-505 has the potential to address a major unmet medical need in a broad population of patients with multiple myeloma. Based on the results from the phase I trial which are now presented at the international myeloma meeting, we have decided to continue our studies on BI-505 with a new smaller trial in patients with asymptomatic multiple myeloma (called “smoldering multiple myeloma”). The interesting preclinical studies showing enhanced anti-tumor effect when combining BI-505 with approved drugs, support to move forward with a clinical trial in which BI-505 is combined with another drug, representing a logic continuation of the clinical development process for our hitherto most advanced project.”

— END —

Background information:

About BI-505
The candidate drug BI-505 is a human antibody that specifically binds to the ICAM-1 adhesion protein (also known as CD54). Expression of ICAM -1 is increased on myeloma cells, which makes it a suitable target for a candidate drug. BI-505 exerts its antimyeloma activity by inducing programmed cell death in myeloma cells and by engaging patient´s immune cells to attack myeloma cells. In several animal models, BI-505 has been shown to kill tumor cells more efficiently than existing drugs.

The first results from the phase I study of BI-505 in patients in advanced stages of the malignant disease multiple myeloma were reported earlier this year. The preliminary analysis showed that BI-505 has an advantageous safety profile. In dose groups where extended therapy was offered, 24% of these severely ill patients demonstrated stable disease for at least two months, indicating effect of BI-505.

The number of newly diagnosed patients with multiple myeloma worldwide is estimated to more than 40,000 per year.

BI-505 has received Orphan Drug Designation in both Europe and the US for the indication multiple myeloma. This provides BioInvent with market exclusivity for treatment of multiple myeloma with an antibody against ICAM-1 for up to 10 years after marketing approval is granted.

About BioInvent
BioInvent International AB, listed on the NASDAQ OMX Stockholm (BINV), is a research-based pharmaceutical company focused on discovery and development of innovative antibody-based drugs against cancer. The Company’s pipeline currently includes three product candidates for the treatment of cancer.

The company’s competitive position is underpinned by n-CoDeR®, a proprietary antibody development platform. The scope and strength of this platform is also used to develop antibody-based drugs in collaboration with partners who finance the development of the new drug, and provide BioInvent the right to milestone payments and royalties on sales. These partners include Bayer HealthCare, Daiichi Sankyo, Mitsubishi Tanabe and Servier. More information is available at www.bioinvent.com.

For many of us who suffer the incurable cancer called multiple myeloma,there was one person we turned to above all for information, guidance and wit, Chris Hollyer. MM took your life, Chris, but it will never take the patient and gentle spirit you left behind.
– Ed Gorman

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